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Deck Construction/Remodeling Question

PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 10:37 pm
by JediSkipdogg
Need some help from those that have experience building decks.

Our deck is approximately 60 feet by 16 feet. The first 24 feet is what use to be an enclosed sunroom but the prior owners converted it to part of the deck some many years ago. The wood there is in excellent condition. The problem is the other 36 or so feet is heavily rotting and also has a hot tub at one end that they did not properly support underneath. That section of the deck has settled approximately 5 inches around the hot tub.

The deck is built with dual 2x12s (one on each side of the 4x4 support post) on 8 foot centers coming off the house. On top of those are 2x8s run every 24 inches parallel to the house.

My goal, once I get the hot tub off the deck, is to kill two birds with one stone. My question is how. I want to replace the wood boards with a Trex type decking material. My plan is possibly only replace the portion not where the sunroom is. Can I cut into the 2x8s at all to relevel the deck? If not, is the only option to butt another 2x8 up to the 2x8 already there and start releveling the deck that way?

Re: Deck Construction/Remodeling Question

PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 3:15 am
by ESAFO
JediSkipdogg wrote:My goal, once I get the hot tub off the deck, is to kill two birds with one stone. My question is how. I want to replace the wood boards with a Trex type decking material. My plan is possibly only replace the portion not where the sunroom is. Can I cut into the 2x8s at all to relevel the deck? If not, is the only option to butt another 2x8 up to the 2x8 already there and start releveling the deck that way?

Sawzall will speed this project up alot & yes will cut through any nail or screw already holding existing decking in place, this way you can still use existing 4x4 already in place as long as there not part of the problem.
Have you checked 4x4 to make sure there also level?

Re: Deck Construction/Remodeling Question

PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 4:24 am
by ESAFO
You may also want to think about once you remove old decking to install another 4x4 for added support underneath where hot tub will be reset.

Re: Deck Construction/Remodeling Question

PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 5:51 am
by JediSkipdogg
ESAFO wrote:You may also want to think about once you remove old decking to install another 4x4 for added support underneath where hot tub will be reset.


My plan is OFF the deck and to build a small 2 foot wide walkway around it so the tub is level with the deck. And then a gate for child control. This way I don't have to worry about the deck settling any more. From what I can tell, they added extra support. But my guess is, simply not enough for I'm guessing 400 lbs of water plus tub.

Re: Deck Construction/Remodeling Question

PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 6:34 am
by ESAFO
Okay well since that is the case I would go to the contractors desk at a local Lowe's or Home Depot and they will be able to give you the proper info you will need per square inch rating for the size and weight of hot tub.
This way it takes all the guesswork out and you have proper info for the size of the hot tub.
Also you can tell them your exact plans and measurements what you're working with now.
Also take several different pictures from different angles to show them this way they know exactly what they're dealing with and they could probably even draw it up on their computer for you.

Re: Deck Construction/Remodeling Question

PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 9:36 am
by evan price
JediSkipdogg wrote: But my guess is, simply not enough for I'm guessing 400 lbs of water plus tub.

Water is eight pounds per gallon more like 4000 pounds minimum.

Re: Deck Construction/Remodeling Question

PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 10:44 am
by JediSkipdogg
evan price wrote:
JediSkipdogg wrote: But my guess is, simply not enough for I'm guessing 400 lbs of water plus tub.

Water is eight pounds per gallon more like 4000 pounds minimum.


I meant 400 gallons. So I figure loaded is about 3000 lbs in like a 7x7 area. I'm just not sure moving it, building up the supports, and such would even be a good idea. Therefore, I figure take it off the deck, then build the deck around it so it's like an in-deck hottub.

Re: Deck Construction/Remodeling Question

PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 11:54 am
by ESAFO
I don't see there being a cost savings doing it either way the main benefit with taking it completely out setting it deck height and starting all over is that you will know that it is properly done.
It sounds like the direction you want to go is remove the tub set it deck height and start fresh especially for the peace of mind in knowing it is supported correctly.
This in return will also make the original deck repair a lot easier removing old replacing new.

Re: Deck Construction/Remodeling Question

PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 4:54 pm
by TJW815
Anytime a hot tub is on a deck it should be 6x6s not 4x4s. Also, if you want to use a composite deck material take into co side ration it is heavier.

For the part that has settled, I’d dig out the post footer, jack it up to level, and pour in some concrete to set the post back on.

As far as cutting into the 2x8s, I’d need you to explain it better what you’re trying to accomplish.
Plush

Re: Deck Construction/Remodeling Question

PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 8:41 pm
by JediSkipdogg
TJW815 wrote:Anytime a hot tub is on a deck it should be 6x6s not 4x4s. Also, if you want to use a composite deck material take into co side ration it is heavier.


Anyone have experience if the composites are worth the extra cost? I figure planning to live here a long time, overall it would be worth it. No need to stain or do anything else to it over the years from my understanding.

TJW815 wrote:For the part that has settled, I’d dig out the post footer, jack it up to level, and pour in some concrete to set the post back on.


You think it could still settle more? The hot tub is a 2002 model I believe. So it's been on the deck for at least 16 years. I'm thinking all settling has been finished and it would be best to not mess with trying to jack a ton of posts up at the same time.


TJW815 wrote:As far as cutting into the 2x8s, I’d need you to explain it better what you’re trying to accomplish.
Plush


I'm thinking that's a no go. I was thinking if it only settled an inch or two it may be possible. But since I'm talking 5 inches at the most, I can't cut any part of a 2x8 into a 2x3 and expect support from it.

Re: Deck Construction/Remodeling Question

PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 4:10 am
by ashtabula
An easy way to level would be to disconnect the double 2x12 at the sunken post, jack up the 2x12 until level, then reinstall to the post. 5'' is a bit so you will need to cut a piece of post to set on top of the old post between the 2x12, then bolt a new post, it does not need to be the full height of the existing post, behind the old one between the 2x12. Secure the new post to the 2x12. If there is a skirt along the outside, you would need to disconnect that prior to raising, then reconnect. Keep in mind the skirt board may or may not connected to the post, it may be nailed to the 2x12 if that's the case do nothing it will raise with the deck.

Re: Deck Construction/Remodeling Question

PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 11:20 am
by 502ci
As far as composite material that is what I went with and though it has been in place only 4 years so far it still looks like it was just installed. Should be good for 25 years according to it's specs. I will say I was amazed how much heavier the boards are...I am gonna guess, they might be twice as heavy as pressure treated boards.

Re: Deck Construction/Remodeling Question

PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 8:33 pm
by TJW815
Sorry for all the spelling errors. Fat fingers and too lazy to proofread lol.

Composite is great if you install it correctly. Some very important things. Use the hidden fasteners(screws at an angle through the side). Properly gap the boards. Properly clean and seal all non composite parts of deck before you install composite using premium sealers.

Benefits:
No splinters
No staining
No sanding
Only need to Pressure wash it occasionally (less if boards are gapped correctly)

Buy a couple extra boards and store under the deck as a just in case for a few years down the road. Same with any handrails or spindles.

Re: Deck Construction/Remodeling Question

PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2018 8:00 am
by AlanM
Just out of curiosity, what's the name of composite decking you're planning on using?
I'm just trying to visualize your situation.

There's a member here that had a beautiful deck added to his house using long 2 x 4 (2 x 6?) Trex boards.
That was quite a few years ago. Trex has significantly expanded their line of products since then.

Re: Deck Construction/Remodeling Question

PostPosted: Fri Jun 15, 2018 12:43 pm
by TJW815
I recommend timbertech brand composite decking. Good product and made here in Ohio, in Wilmington